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Tony Bloom and Chris Hughton: Freedom of Brighton and Hove

FreedomMr Mayor, Brighton and Hove Albion is part of this city’s history, it is part of the fabric of this place, it is so important to so many in this place as the sea of blue and white that washed over Hove Lawns last Sunday showed to the world.

It is four years since this council awarded Dick Knight the Freedom of the City in recognition of his role in saving Brighton and Hove Albion.

Twenty years ago, just as this council was coming into existence, so our football club teetered on the edge of going out of existence. A club founded in 1901, a club that was the first body to unite our two towns, a club my family has supported for almost a century.

A club that is valued so highly by so many, across generations, across every part of our community. The Albion, as we saw on the last day at the Goldstone, in the demonstrations for a new stadium, in the fans on the pitch a month ago, and in the thousands on the seafront at the weekend, transcends mere fixtures and statistics. It is an emotion which binds us.

Today Brighton and Hove Albion has once again joined the top flight of English football, is in the Premier League for the first time, and in just three months will emerge on to the global sporting stage. That is down to the club and the team led by the two men we, on behalf of the people of the City of Brighton and Hove, meet to honour today.

It is fitting that it is exactly eight years ago today that Mr Tony Bloom took over as Chairman of Brighton and Hove Albion. The gratitude of tens of thousands of Brighton and Hove Albion fans goes to him, a man whose family is steeped in the club, a man whose support of the club has been unparalleled not just in financial terms, but in heart and soul as well.

He is that rare thing in football, an owner and investor who is also a loyal, diehard, lifelong fan. No-one can doubt, seeing him celebrate goals, victories and promotion home and away, not just from the directors box but from the terraces alongside the travelling supporters, just what the club means to him. The millions he has invested in the team will now reap the rewards, for the club, for the fans and for this city.

Promotion, profile, pride. Premier League.

After almost winning promotion to the Premier League at the first few attempts following the move to the fantastic American Express Community Stadium, in December 2014 it seemed our opportunity had slipped away and relegation threatened.

The appointment of Mr Chris Hughton, a football professional of the highest calibre, with an illustrious career as a player at Spurs and for the Republic of Ireland, and as a manager at Newcastle behind him, heralded a return to success.

Under his inspired leadership the Albion have won an astonishing 50% of their games, coming agonisingly close to promotion last season, but this year making it certain with three games to spare.

For me no moment this season summed up what he inspires in his players more than the team lifting Antony Knockaerts shirt aloft following the death of his father. His calm, confident and determined leadership is an inspiration to all in sport and beyond.

His contribution to the sport and success at every level has won him a long list of awards. In March Football’s “Black List” recognised his achievements in coaching, a week after he won coach of the year at the British Ethnic Diversity Sports Awards. He has been awarded Championship Manager of the Month nine times, more than any other manager.

He was League Managers Association Manager of the Year in 2010 and 2016. He holds two FA Cup winners medals, a UEFA cup winners medal, and two Championship promotion honours.

It is my honour as Leader of Brighton and Hove City Council, and my pleasure as a lifelong Albion fan, to propose that Tony Bloom and Chris Hughton are awarded the Freedom of the City of Brighton and Hove today.

In making this award we recognise the achievement of everyone associated with the club, from the board to the backroom staff, the players and coaches, the sponsors and Albion In The Community, and of course the fans who stuck with the team, who fought for survival and the new home at Falmer that Tony Bloom and Martin Perry delivered.

Together, we are Brighton and Hove Albion, and we are on our way to the Premier League.

On Sunday tens of thousands cheered and applauded Tony Bloom, Chris Hughton and the team from one side of the city to the other, on a day none of us who were there will forget.

Today Mr Mayor I move that we honour the Albion’s Premier League success by awarding these leaders, these heroes of our football club, the Freedom of the City of Brighton and Hove.

10×10: our half-term report

ManifestoFrontTwo years ago this week I was elected to lead the city council, alongside an excellent team of councillors who are working hard like me to make a difference.

We promised “a council that works for you”, and we’ve worked quietly and persistently to get the basics right, to do what you expect from your council.

This week new communal bins are appearing on our streets, joining the smart compactor bins introduced last year. Garden waste brown bins have been hugely popular. Soon new wheeled recycling bins, already well received in Portslade and Hangleton, will arrive on doorsteps to further boost our recycling rates.

We are investing £7m in better street lighting. We are halfway to building 500 new council homes, and work on 1000 affordable homes begins soon.

We’ve protected our Royal Pavilion from cuts and will save the Madeira Terraces. Our libraries are all still open and for longer hours. Our family of schools continues to improve.

We are protecting the vulnerable in the city, with a new ethical care charter, with millions more being spent on care for children, older people, people with disabilities and those tackling chronic health issues.

We’ve stopped cuts to domestic violence services. We’ve made tackling mental health stigma and rough sleeping top priorities. We’ve invested in our credit union, and last week abolished child funeral charges and council tax charges for care leavers.

Our city economy has to benefit everyone, not just a few. Last month I launched the Southern Accelerator to win investment in infrastructure. We got our target of 1000 new apprenticeships two years early. We are drawing in billions of pounds of investment into our seafront and elsewhere. We have made significant  improvements to our planning service.

Despite the huge challenges of cuts to our funding, the spiraling costs of social care, and Brexit, we are delivering. Our auditors say we are delivering good value for money, and the recent Local Government Association review said that firm foundations are in place so we can now  progress quickly.

These are just some of the 100 positive things we’ve achieved in two years, and we will be listing them in batches of ten over the next two weeks on Facebook, Twitter and our website.


We won’t let up in the next two, there is much more to do. Soon we will announce new plans for our third year in office. I hope that after that time you will put your trust in us again to keep getting the basics right, protecting the vulnerable and growing our economy for everyone.

_________________________________________________________________

10×10: Here are our one hundred achievements:

First 10

  1. Building 57 council homes at Kite Place https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-council-housing-scheme-takes-shape
  2. Rolling out wheeled bin recycling https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/cash-wheelie-bins-will-increase-recycling
  3. New life for Shelter Hall https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/parking-and-travel/roads-and-highways/rebuilding-former-west-street-shelter-hall
  4. Setting 1000 apprenticeships challenge http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/jobs/apprenticeships/1000-apprenticeships
  5. New trust for Royal Pavilion & Museums https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council-moves-secure-long-term-future-museums
  6. Investing in “smart” street lighting https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/future-bright-super-smart-street-lighting
  7. New Brighton and Hove Communities fund https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/a-proposed-new-way-forward-trust-funds-managed-council
  8. Fighting HIV http://gscene.com/news/city-to-join-initiative-to-eradicate-hiv-in-brighton-hove-by-2030/
  9. Improving the Planning service https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/planning-services-steps-improve-performance-working
  10. Campaigning to help rough sleepers https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/make-change-count

 

Second 10

  1. Rescue plan for Madeira Terraces https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/people-power-called-upon-help-save-madeira-terraces
  2. Care Leavers Trust Fund agreed https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000883/M00006141/AI00052207/$BrightonandHoveChildrensCommitteeSavingsandTrustFundforCICmay2016.docA.ps.pdf
  3. Signing up to the Ethical Care Charter http://www.brightonhovelabour.com/new_contract_will_deliver_labour_s_ethical_home_care_pledge
  4. Rent Smart partnership for private tenants http://www.brightonhovelabour.com/rentsmart_helping_private_rented_sector_tenants http://rentsmartbrightonhove.org/
  5. Council’s value for money rating improves https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000699/M00006102/AI00053286/$20160926095149_009706_0039542_AuditStandardscoversheetSept.docxA.ps.pdf
  6. Litter patrols begin https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/drop-litter-pick-a-fine-0
  7. Credit union strengthened https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/bhcc-seeks-strengthen-citys-credit-union-services
  8. Libraries hours extended https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/libraries-open-extra-thanks-pioneering-out-hours-scheme
  9. Child burial fees removed http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/child-burial-charges-scrapped-in-brighton-and-hove-1-7947735
  10. Big Conversation on city parks https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/big-thanks-3500-responding-parks-survey

 

Third 10

  1. Freedom of the City for Bloom and Hughton https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/mgconvert2pdf.aspx?id=109142 http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2017/04/17/council-leader-proposes-honouring-premier-league-brighton-and-hove-albion-bosses-with-freedom-of-the-city/
  2. Affordable homes joint venture delivers 1000 homes https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-project-build-affordable-housing-city-agreed
  3. New communal bins https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-bins-keep-brighton-and-hove-tidy
  4. City in top 30 for primary schools https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-primary-pupils-top-30-nationally-key-stage-2
  5. Preston Park velodrome restored https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/preston-park-velodrome-reopened
  6. Fairness Commission work completed https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/fairness-commission-announces-their-recommendations-city
  7. City to gain new “Lane” http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/work-begins-on-new-lane-in-brighton-1-7808245
  8. Time to Change pledge signed https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/pledgewall/organisations/brighton-hove-city-council
  9. £12m boost for Waterfront arena project https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/video-%C2%A312m-govt-funding-towards-brighton-arena-0
  10. Rough Sleeping Strategy agreed https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/housing/general-housing/rough-sleeping-strategy

 

Fourth 10

  1. City Plan agreed https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/major-milestone-citys-planning-blueprint
  2. Action to Poverty Proof the School Day https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000883/M00006145/AI00055223/$20170201142233_010022_0042571_PovertyProofingtheSchoolDayupdatedraftforcommittee15January.docxA.ps.pdf
  3. National tourism event Explore GB hosted https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/best-british-showcased-brighton-hove
  4. Care leavers to be exempted from council tax https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000912/M00006702/AI00056866/$20170425101629_011577_0043649_CommitteeReportTemplate100614newsavedformat.docxA.ps.pdf
  5. Motor Neurone Disease Charter signed http://www.mndassociation.org/news-and-events/latest-news/success-two-more-councils-adopt-the-mnd-charter/
  6. Council begins commercial waste collection http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/environment/recycling-rubbish-and-street-cleaning/commercial-recycling-and-rubbish
  7. Amnesty returns 6 homes https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/tenancy-amnesty-returns-six-homes
  8. Office move saves £2m https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/%C2%A32-million-saving-a-year-hove-town-hall-officially-opens
  9. Fuel poverty tackled https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city-gets-top-marks-tackling-fuel-poverty
  10. Support services shared to save money: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/four-councils-sharing-legal-services-save-%C2%A31-million-a-year

 

Fifth 10

  1. 45 extra care flats opening in July https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/housing/council-housing/brooke-mead-extra-care-housing-scheme-0
  2. Garden waste collection service introduced https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/garden-waste-scheme-grows
  3. £18m improvement plan for Pavilion Estate https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/contractors-appointment-kick-starts-first-phase-royal-pavilion-estate-project
  4. Pilot for reducing holiday costs https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-term-dates-announced-school-year-2017-2018
  5. Direction of travel for adult social care agreed https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000826/M00006003/AI00047597/$20151009095054_007754_0033367_HWBReportTemplate261114.docA.ps.pdf https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000826/M00006003/AI00047597/$20151009095055_007915_0033368_AdultSocialCareJourney.pdfA.ps.pdf
  6. Residents to get online access to services https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council-invests-digital-services-put-customer-first
  7. “Southern accelerator” for city region http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/politics/greater-brighton-should-be-a-powerhouse-for-the-south-1-7914766/amp
  8. Tackling anti-social behaviour https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/public-space-protection-orders-come-force
  9. Zip wire given the go ahead https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/brighton%E2%80%99s-300-metre-zip-wire-approved
  10. Parking meters go contactless https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/contactless-pay-and-display-machines-just-ticket-drivers

 

Sixth 10

  1. New Volunteering Policy and Action Plan https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000885/M00006263/AI00054532/$20161116111634_009892_0040530_PowerofVolunteeringBHCCActionPlancommiteereport.docxA.ps.pdf
  2. Meeting the challenge of social care costs https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000117/M00006132/AI00055568/$20170215114506_011422_0042857_Generlafundreport.docx.pdf4
  3. Seafront swimming pool on the way https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/yet-another-big-investment-city%E2%80%99s-billion-pound-beachfront
  4. Enforcement action taken against HMOs https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-licensing-could-cut-impact-shared-and-student-homes
  5. LGBT schools support rated best in the country: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council%E2%80%99s-lgbt-support-schools-rated-among-best-country
  6. Transport team awarded top prize https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/brighton-hove-wins-top-national-transport-award
  7. Helping child refugees http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14953821.Brighton_and_Hove_offers_new_life_to_65_young_refugees_fleeing_homeland_violence/
  8. “Crime not to care” campaign is great success https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/your-street-set-become-a-crime-scene
  9. Creating new council temporary accommodation https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000884/M00006162/AI00054328/$20170110095512_010072_0041279_Nov2016ReviewoffutureoptionsforStonehurstCourtv2.docxA.ps.pdf
  10. Planning application in for Preston Barracks http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/preston-barracks-development-plans-submitted-to-city-council-1-7841314

 

Seventh 10

  1. 93% of city schools now good or outstanding https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-ofsted-success-%E2%80%98a-fantastic-achievement%E2%80%99
  2. Tourists give high rating to city https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/report-shows-visitors-are-happy-brighton-hove
  3. Fairer housing allocation process https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/changing-way-council-homes-are-allocated
  4. Big Belly Bins introduced https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council%E2%80%99s-bigbelly-bins-able-devour-more-waste
  5. Support for British Sign Language Charter https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000885/M00006265/AI00055696/$20170303090257_011360_0043168_BHCCBSLCharterCommitteeReportMarch2017FINAL.docxA.ps.pdf
  6. Textile recycling boosts communities https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/community-groups-benefit-new-textile-recycling-scheme
  7. Lead Member for Mental Health is first for council http://www.brightonhovelabour.com/improving_our_efforts_to_suicide_prevention
  8. Civic Centre vision for Brighton Town Hall https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/future-brighton-town-hall
  9. Rail South proposal to help commuters http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/opinion/warren-morgan-my-plan-for-a-new-body-to-run-our-rail-services-1-7792962
  10. Air quality improves https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-air-quality-improving

 

Eighth 10

  1. £2.5m funding for homelessness prevention https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/bid-success-boost-homeless-prevention-and-rough-sleeping-work
  2. Recycling up https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city-waste-services-improving-residents-and-businesses
  3. CAMHS plan agreed https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/mgconvert2pdf.aspx?id=102539
  4. Supporting carers https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000826/M00006147/AI00052527/$20160704103201_009286_0038497_SupportingCarersCarersRapidNeedsAssessmentCarersStrategyandCarersC.docA.ps.pdf
  5. Funding for Saltdean library also helps Lido project https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/library-funding-could-boost-saltdean-lido-restoration
  6. Domestic Violence funding protected https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000117/M00006132/AI00055568/$20170215114508_010289_0042863_Appendix6CombinedISFPSPRG090217.docx.pdf75
  7. Building blocks in place says LGA review https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/outside-view-improving-services
  8. Think tank for the city http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2016/10/16/think-tank-to-look-for-ways-to-bring-about-better-brighton-and-hove/
  9. Bike Share arriving soon https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/brighton-hoves-new-bike-share-scheme-track-summer
  10. Improving procurement https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000117/M00006132/AI00055568/$20170215114508_010289_0042863_Appendix6CombinedISFPSPRG090217.docx.pdf84

 

 

Ninth 10

  1. City-wide council homes programme shortlisted for award https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/sites/brighton-hove.gov.uk/files/New%20Homes%20for%20Neighbourhoods%20Update%20March%202017.pdf
  2. New street sweepers https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/clean-green-sweeping-machines-hit-citys-streets https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/clean-sweep-recycling
  3. Patient transport back on track http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2016/11/01/patient-transport-contractor-to-lose-60m-contract/
  4. Free wifi https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-free-city-centre-wi-fi-network
  5. More in-house fostering saves £350k in agency placements https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000912/M00006399/AI00054494/$20161128145904_009882_0040733_PRGQ2201617progressupdateCorporateKeyPerformanceIndicatorsappendix.pdfA.ps.pdf22 https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/fostering-%E2%80%93-it-can-be-great-your-own-children-well
  6. Most parking charges frozen https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/parking-charges-mostly-frozen-next-year
  7. Fortnightly residents e-newsletter begins https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/council-and-democracy/news/your-brighton-hove-email-newsletter
  8. Park improvements https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/work-set-start-%C2%A353000-revamp-brighton-park https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/all-smiles-playground-re-opens
  9. I am Whole mental health campaign supported https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/iamwhole
  10. Free swimming for under 16s http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14494640.Free_swimming_for_under_16s_in_Brighton_and_Hove_to_continue/ http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/leisure-and-libraries/sports-and-activity/free-swimming

 

Tenth 10

  1. Restoring Stanmer Park https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/stanmer-park-restoration
  2. SEN nurseries are outstanding https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council%E2%80%99s-sen-nurseries-maintain-%E2%80%98outstanding%E2%80%99-ofsted-ratings
  3. Food poverty action plan wins award http://bhcommunityworks.org.uk/sector-star-winners/ https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000826/M00006148/AI00053166/$20160909164754_009485_0039198_FINALFoodPovertyActionPlan2015.pdfA.ps.pdf
  4. “Let’s get you home” campaign supported https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000826/M00006146/AI00050663/$BCFapp3.pptxA.ps.pdf
  5. £1 billion seafront investment plan https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000912/M00006398/AI00053700/$20160930112107_009680_0039629_BHSIPFinalVersionSept2016.pdfA.ps.pdf
  6. Action for refugees http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-34981828 https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council-seeking-landlords-and-coordinating-help-refugees-syria
  7. King Alfred given go-ahead https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council-chooses-crest-nicholson-redevelop-king-alfred-site
  8. Support for social prescribing and befriending http://impact-initiatives.org.uk/contact-point-befriending-launched-tackle-isolation-brighton-hove/
  9. Smart tech to manage city traffic flow https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000823/M00005632/AI00050296/$Enc.%203%20for%20201617%20Local%20Transport%20Plan%20Capital%20Programme_v1.docxA.ps.pdf
  10. £2m management savings https://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000117/M00006132/AI00055568/$20170215114506_011422_0042857_Generlafundreport.docx.pdf54

 

2016: fifty positive things your council has achieved this year

 

received_10154080748042534.jpeg2016 has been a year memorable for many of the wrong reasons. Here in Brighton and Hove though, there has been a lot that has been positive.

Here are just some of the things your Labour-led council has achieved despite huge cuts from government.

  1. Affordable homes joint venture approved to deliver 1000 homes: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-project-build-affordable-housing-city-agreed
  2. Air quality improves: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-air-quality-improving
  3. Animal warden service revamped: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/new-animal-warden-service
  4. Apprenticeships up by 19 per cent in the city, putting us above the national average for the first time; new challenge set: http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/jobs/apprenticeships/1000-apprenticeships
  5. Big Belly Bins introduced: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council%E2%80%99s-bigbelly-bins-able-devour-more-waste
  6. Big Conversation on city parks draws huge response: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/big-thanks-3500-responding-parks-survey
  7. Budget passed: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/budget-agreed-201617
  8. Care leavers’ trust fund established: http://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/Published/C00000883/M00006141/AI00052207/$BrightonandHoveChildrensCommitteeSavingsandTrustFundforCICmay2016.docA.ps.pdf
  9. City Innovation Challenge winners announced: http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/council-and-democracy/council-finance/city-innovation-challenge
  10. Commercial waste collection service earns money for services: http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/environment/recycling-rubbish-and-street-cleaning/commercial-recycling-and-rubbish
  11. Council house building programme on track to deliver 500 new homes: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/housing/council-housing/new-homes-neighbourhoods https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/latest-approval-new-generation-council-housing https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/work-starts-57-new-council-homes
  12. Credit Union strengthened: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/bhcc-seeks-strengthen-citys-credit-union-services
  13. Ethical Care Charter adopted: http://www.brightonhovelabour.com/new_contract_will_deliver_labour_s_ethical_home_care_pledge
  14. Fairness Commission completes work: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/fairness-commission-announces-their-recommendations-city
  15. Food poverty action plan wins best partnership at the city sector stars event: http://bhcommunityworks.org.uk/sector-star-winners/
  16. Foster parents increase by 8 per cent in last year; saving £350k on agency out placements.
  17. Free childcare doubled: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/%C2%A3120k-council-bid-success-free-childcare-plan
  18. Fuel poverty tackled: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city-gets-top-marks-tackling-fuel-poverty
  19. Garden waste collection service introduced: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/garden-waste-scheme-grows
  20. HIV prevention Fast Track Cities Initiative “90-90-90” adopted: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14948188.Brighton_and_Hove_bid_for_HIV_Fast_Track_City_status/
  21. Housing allocations improved: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/housing-allocations-proposals-strengthen-focus-local-need
  22. King Alfred replacement given go-ahead: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council-chooses-crest-nicholson-redevelop-king-alfred-site
  23. LGBT schools support rated best in the country: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/council%E2%80%99s-lgbt-support-schools-rated-among-best-country
  24. Library hours extended: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/libraries-open-extra-thanks-pioneering-out-hours-scheme
  25. Litter fines introduced: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/drop-litter-pick-a-fine-0
  26. Madeira Terraces rescue plan in place: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/%C2%A34m-bid-goes-start-brighton-terraces-re-build
  27. Mental health for young people highlighted in campaign: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/iamwhole
  28. Motor Neurone Disease Charter signed: http://www.mndassociation.org/news-and-events/latest-news/success-two-more-councils-adopt-the-mnd-charter/
  29. Nursery in children’s centre rated outstanding: http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2016/05/16/brighton-nursery-rated-outstanding-after-ofsted-inspection/
  30. Office move saves £2m: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/%C2%A32-million-saving-a-year-hove-town-hall-officially-opens
  31. Parking meters go contactless: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/contactless-pay-and-display-machines-just-ticket-drivers
  32. Pavilion future secured: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/securing-future-royal-pavilion-and-museums
  33. Planning service improves: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/planning-services-steps-improve-performance-working
  34. Recycling improves: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city-waste-services-improving-residents-and-businesses
  35. Refugees helped with support from residents.
  36. Rent Smart launched for private tenants: http://rentsmartbrightonhove.org/
  37. Rough Sleeping Strategy agreed: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/draft-rough-sleeping-strategy-2016-consultation
  38. Seafront gets a billion pounds investment: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/council-and-democracy/news/search-news
  39. Schools success: number of schools rated Good or Outstanding up by 10 per cent (now 92 per cent) city is above the national average for the first time, and now in top 25 for primary schools nationally https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-schools-top-50-key-new-government-performance-table https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-primary-pupils-top-30-nationally-key-stage-2 https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/city%E2%80%99s-schools-are-way-ahead-key-stage-2
  40. Sharing support services to save money: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/four-councils-sharing-legal-services-save-%C2%A31-million-a-year
  41. Shelter Hall work underway: http://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/parking-and-travel/roads-and-highways/rebuilding-former-west-street-shelter-hall
  42. Street Lighting investment approved: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/future-bright-super-smart-street-lighting
  43. Street sweeping boost: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/clean-green-sweeping-machines-hit-citys-streets
  44. Temporary accommodation boosted: http://present.brighton-hove.gov.uk/ieIssueDetails.aspx?IId=50474&PlanId=0&Opt=3#AI49506
  45. Textile recycling boosts funding for communities: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/community-groups-benefit-new-textile-recycling-scheme
  46. Transport team awarded top prize: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/brighton-hove-wins-top-national-transport-award
  47. Velodrome restored: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/preston-park-velodrome-reopened
  48. Volunteering pledge signed: http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2016/11/28/volunteering-race-equality-and-domestic-violence-on-the-agenda-at-brighton-and-hove-council-meeting/
  49. Wheeled bin recycling rolled out: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/cash-wheelie-bins-will-increase-recycling
  50. Zip wire given the go ahead: https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/press-release/brighton%E2%80%99s-300-metre-zip-wire-approved

Bring on 2017: we will deliver even more for Brighton and Hove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

My media week

pr-101_fundrazr-blogIt’s been a busy week on media with interviews on the Budget,social care, devolution and benefit changes. Here’s a round-up:

TV

Sunday Politics South East (from 48 minutes in): http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0833g95/sunday-politics-south-east-27112016

Radio

BBC Sussex, Wednesday: https://twitter.com/BBCSussex/status/804018608707928064

BBC Sussex Breakfast, Thursday (from 2 hours 8 minutes in) : http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04fpc7l

Juice 107, Friday: not yet online

Press and online

Brighton and Hove News, Sunday: http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2016/11/27/facing-hard-budget-cuts-together-brighton-and-hove-council-leader-issues-a-call-for-help/

The Argus, Monday: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14931607.City_faces_falling_behind_without_elected_mayor/

Brighton and Hove News, Wednesday: http://www.brightonandhovenews.org/2016/11/30/brighton-and-hove-council-to-shed-300-staff-and-cut-51m/

City Council website, Wednesday:                                                             https://youtu.be/pyW6DvutooE?list=PLkn6wzCIq2ylpH785q-65w3B_snw35ew-

The Argus, Wednesday: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14937620.__24_million_cuts_for_Brighton_and_Hove_City_Council_in_toughest_year_ever/

Brighton and Hove Independent, Wednesday: http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/brighton-to-brace-itself-for-24-million-council-cuts-1-7706445

My blog, Wednesday:                         https://warrenmorgan.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/getting-the-basics-right-protecting-the-most-vulnerable-and-growing-an-economy-that-benefits-all/

The Argus, Thursday: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14940320.__24m_cuts_for_Brighton_and_Hove_could_make_for__most_difficult_year_ever_/

Change.org petition, Thursday:                                                           https://www.change.org/p/theresa-may-mp-save-our-services

The Argus, Friday: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/14942281.Opposition_claim_Labour_administration_lack_coherent_plan_for___24_million_council_cuts/

Brighton and Hove Independent, Friday: http://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/opinion/warren-morgan-we-cannot-avoid-making-painful-cuts-1-7707138

 

Getting the basics right, protecting the most vulnerable, and growing an economy that benefits all.

 

WM portrait

Our draft Budget for 2017/18 is now out. My Labour & Co-operative Administration is facing up to the harshest ever financial circumstances the city council has faced. We are making a stand, drawing a line in face of the biggest ever cuts imposed by the Conservative Government.

We are protecting:

  • Early years services including nurseries and childrens centres, child protection is our legal duty and top priority
  • Libraries, not just as a place to borrow books but as community advice hubs and assets, the heart of our neighbourhoods approach
  • Refuse, recycling and street cleaning, the basic service your council tax pays for, with £400k coming in from commercial waste collection. Investment in big belly bins, new street cleaning vehicles, garden waste are new service innovations.
  • Public toilets no more cuts proposed, none added in the current year, no additions to the closures chosen by the previous Green Administration
  • Domestic violence we are pushing back against to cuts to this vital preventative service
  • Rough sleeping we are succeeding working to prevent hundreds of families entering homelessness, and are resisting pressure from benefit cuts that put more at risk
  • Poverty proofing the school day was a key recommendation from the Fairness Commission, giving pupils a fair start at school
  • Living Wage protected at local level not the national rebranded minimum wage
  • Social care: we are reviewing and redesigning services to focus on effective signposting, build stronger communities through increased partnership working, provide preventative services and ensure people get the safe, high quality, personalised, accessible and sustainable support they need.

This is our plan, our positive way forward, building a co-operative council and city to keep vital services going:

  • Investing millions in digital customer services
  • Saving millions through managing assets better, like our move from Kings House which will save £2m a year
  • Designing neighbourhood services and partnering with other organisations to keep services going locally through local hubs, volunteer-run parks
  • Saving half a million through our new housing allocations policy
  • A £7m investment in better street lighting that will deliver a £500k saving each year
  • Placing the Royal Pavilion into a trust to protect it and enable it to raise more money
  • Joining the Orbis partnership with neighbouring councils sharing support services to protect jobs and grow capacity
  • Housing investment in new council houses and truly affordable homes to tackle poverty and homelessness, and bring in new council tax
  • Major projects – new infrastructure, economic activity, more business rates/rents
  • Revenue generation from services like commercial waste, vehicle workshops

All this in the face of enormous pressures:

  • Government grant is down by another £11 million this year. It is shrinking from £140m to £6m over an 8 year period, a 40% funding reduction in real terms
  • We have already saved £70 million in last 4 years, £20 million in current year, leaving no easy cuts, no simple solutions, no savings that are pain-free
  • We still have to make £51 million savings over next three years, £24 million in the coming year
  • We are still £3m off balancing the Budget for 2017/18 – more savings need to be found
  • The £125m income from council tax is now smaller that £150m costs of care, increasing by £7m in the coming year
  • We are putting £1.5m more into supporting council tax payments for people on low incomes as Government funding for that scheme is cut
  • We are putting £300k more into free bus passes for older people, from the £562k additional parking revenue – the total cost of free bus travel is now more than £11m
  • We are making a further £2m of management savings

Cuts include:

  • £750k from youth services, however £250k remains for advocacy, services and support for young people vulnerable to exploitation, involved in substance misuse, entering the criminal justice system or requiring emotional and mental health support. We also continue to fund Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) work, the Youth Employability Service, the Youth Offending Service, and services for adolescents.
  • £600k from parks covered in our Big Conversation, and £100k from sports club subsidies
  • £290k from supported bus routes – still leaving a £900k subsidy

We are not alone. This is all in a national context:

An additional 2% social care “precept” on council tax, above what was allowed in the last financial year, has been asked for by most councils responsible for for social care, but this was not announced in the Government’s Autumn Statement. Even if it is, it won’t be Government that pays it will be us, with them transferring the financial burden of social care on to local taxation.

LGA Chair Lord Porter (Conservative) warns that councils will face an ‘extremely challenging’ situation over the next few years to tackle the £5.8bn funding gap by 2020: ‘Many councils are faced with difficult decisions about which services are scaled back or stopped altogether.’ He said the government must take urgent action to fund social care properly, if councils are to stand any chance of protecting care services for elderly and vulnerable people. Porter said that extra council tax-raising powers would not bring in enough money to alleviate the pressure on social care services for elderly and vulnerable, and that people are at breaking point now.

So far 24 top tier councils both Labour and Conservative-led are taking up full increase in council tax allowed at just under 4%. The days of council tax “freezes” are over.

Other councils have it even worse. In Liverpool all council-run services, including libraries, sports centres, maintenance of parks, highway repairs, street cleaning and rubbish collections, would have to be cut by 50% to balance the books, with Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson warning there will soon be no funds left, even for basic services.

There is a nationwide crisis in social care:  77 of the 152 local authorities responsible for providing care for the elderly have seen at least one residential and nursing care provider close in the last six months, because cuts to council budgets meant there were insufficient funds to run adequate services. In 48 councils, at least one company that provides care for the elderly in their own homes has ceased trading.

Is the Government getting it’s priorities right? No.

  • The Autumn Statement gave £240m for Grammar Schools whilst failing to help councils with social care and basic service funding.
  • Over the course of the Conservative’s decade in power they will give away £21 billion in tax cuts for higher earners, and another £1 billion in inheritance tax.
  • In the same period they are handing over £12 billion in corporation tax cuts for big businesses.
  • All this while £7.6 billion is cut from local government. That’s councils like ours.

Find out more about our Budget and watch my Budget message here.

Sign my petition calling on the Government to reverse their tax cuts and restore council funding: https://www.change.org/p/theresa-may-mp-save-our-services

 

Facing hard budget cuts together

images

There is no sugaring the pill, no sweetening the message, no avoiding the truth. Your council Budget in the spring will contain cuts to services and jobs unlike any seen so far. We are likely to have to make savings of tens of millions in the coming years, on top of the £100 million savings that have been delivered over the past five years. At the same time it is likely that your council tax will increase by  at least 4%. And the cuts will continue until 2020.

I know there will be campaigns and protests over many of the cuts we are being forced to make, strong cases put forward as to why services should be spared the axe, why they bring value above and beyond their cost. Those campaigns will be right, their anger justified and understandable. There are no services the council provides that do not bring benefit to you, your community or our city. Any cut we make will have an impact.

So why are these cuts happening? Three reasons. Firstly the Government is removing the third of our service funding it has until now provided. £27m is being cut from the money the Treasury gives Brighton and Hove each year by 2020.

Secondly, more and more people need the social care services the council has to provide. Care for the growing number of older people, people with disabilities or long term health conditions, and vulnerable children in care. It is the biggest part of our budget and we have to find £10 million more next year, and by 2020 care costs could eat our entire budget.

Last year the Government added 2% to permitted council tax increases to help fund this, but the £2 million that brings in isn’t enough to keep pace. Most Conservative-led councils agree. The government may yet add a further 2% for next year, although there was no indication of it in the Autumn Statement.

Thirdly, we are in the middle of a housing crisis with rising demand for temporary accommodation as many people struggle with rents due to benefit reductions. We are building new council homes and new affordable homes as fast as we can. Our joint venture with Hyde Housing due for approval in December could deliver over a thousand at just 60% of market rates.

Why aren’t we making other savings, finding new income or investing to save? We are. My team of Labour councillors is working tirelessly with support from officers to find new ways of meeting the financial challenges. we are joining an innovative scheme with East Sussex and Surrey to share “back office” support services like human resources, finance and legal.

We are investing money from selling buildings like Kings House in better online services, and in the process saving £2 million a year in running costs.  We are innovating, changing, bringing co-operative ideas to how we work with you to keep services going. There will be many ways you can pitch in and play your part.

In an uncertain global economy we will fight for investment in good jobs and affordable homes in Brighton and Hove. Any new development brings in additional business rates and council tax to fund your services. We are earning money from new enforcement fines, clothing recycling and vehicle workshop services to help fund front line refuse and street cleaning services.

Over the past eighteen months we have been dashing to catch up with other councils who have been changing the way they fund and provide services for years. Transforming and innovating in what we do needs time and investment.

Why isn’t parking revenue used to offset the cuts? Most of the money we get from tickets, permits and charges goes to fund free bus travel for older people. Why not charge students council tax or just borrow more? The simple answer is that we can’t by law.

Will being able to keep all our business rates help? That won’t happen until 2020, by which time revaluations, appeals and discounts by Government may reduce what we get from local businesses significantly.

Why aren’t we fighting the cuts? The Green Administration waved placards and beat drums outside an empty Treasury, and handed petitions to No 10 that were simply ignored. That’s gesture politics,  we are making the case to ministers, both directly and with our council colleagues across the country and across the political divide, for fairer funding, for the tools we need to do the job you expect us to do. Just as you have had to find new ways of making ends meet, so should we. Ultimately, by law we have to balance the books.

Despite the flood tide of cuts, we won’t just stand there King Canute-like as the water rises over us, we will lead the way to firmer ground. We won’t fall for offers of cheaper delivery from big private companies that could tie you into second rate services. We will work hard to get the basics right, to protect the vulnerable and to grow an economy that benefits everyone. We need your help and support. Let’s fight for your city and your services together.

Financial challenges, Labour values


Like Labour councils across the country, we are facing the complete cut of our support grant from the Conservative Government by 2020. Like Labour leaders, Labour mayors and Labour MPs, I have joined calls for them to end the cuts and stop the rapid erosion of the essential public services councils provide. I’ve taken those calls to the heart of Government, to Cabinet ministers and local MPs. Every week, in newspaper columns and in radio interviews, I remind the residents of our city of how deep and damaging these Tory cuts are.

Recently I and other Labour leaders met the Shadow Local Government Secretary Teresa Pearce MP, who was very supportive and pledged to lead the fight in the Commons for a fairer deal for our councils and local services. We have an excellent shadow CLG team in the Commons, including former council leader Jim McMahon MP.
We will tackle the 2017 Budget based on three Labour principles: getting basic public services right, protecting services for the most vulnerable, and ensuring everyone shares the benefits of a growing local economy.

So what is the scale of the challenge we face here in the city?

The council spends around £760 million a year on hundreds of different services from street cleaning to schools, libraries to homelessness, and street lighting to licensing bars and restaurants. The biggest part of our budget is social care, at around £163 million. In this budget we will have to address a predicted budget gap of £18m through savings, following a similar level of savings already being implemented this year.

This is because the government is cutting entirely what is called the revenue support grant to councils by 2020 and we have to meet growing costs and demands, across adult and children’s social services. The reduction in grant funding alone is around £27m by 2020. Our overall funding has reduced by around £45m over the last five years which, added to increasing costs and demands, has resulted in the very large annual savings we have and will continue to have to make.

As the government grant support is cut, there will be less money available for services the council could provide but isn’t required to provide. The bulk of the income we receive from parking charges, around £12.7m, goes toward funding the free bus passes for older people that the government does not fund. Similarly, we also have to put another £1.5m into support for people who can’t afford to pay all of their council tax, as Government is cutting the funding needed to do that.

The government is now also looking at councils taking financial responsibility for some NHS services, in crisis locally. Looking after older people, children in care and people with disabilities is already the largest part of our budget. Early estimates show that next year it will cost us at least £10m more. The government will again, through councils, allow two per cent to be added to your council tax bill to pay for this, but that will only raise £2.4m, not enough to keep up. Some councils are asking for another 2% on top of the 4% already allowed, but that would hit many on lower incomes very hard.

Your council tax used to make up around a third of what we spend on general fund services, with another third made up from fees and charges and the remaining third from business rates and government grants. There are also uncertainties regarding business rates; the government currently retains half of our local business rates, around £54m, and will be revaluing business rates next year. We don’t know how much we will receive from business rates by 2020, so we need to ensure more businesses come to the city. Businesses that create real jobs, not zero-hour contracts, and who pay a proper Living Wage, businesses that pay their taxes and are socially responsible.

As more students come to the city, fewer households pay council tax. While being a university city is part of our identity, there’s no ignoring the financial impact of providing services to non-council tax paying households. Landlords who let properties to students are also protected from business rates by the government; we have called for the right to charge landlords business rates so we recoup some of the money we need for public services.

Earlier this year we ran our City Innovation Challenge to find out if individuals, schools and businesses, had ideas to help out as our budgets shrink. Many said we should look to volunteering, and we have recently agreed a new volunteering policy. Meanwhile we are changing how we deliver services, with much more online, and more focus on joined up services in your neighbourhoods, designed by you around what works in your community.

As a Labour council we are building 500 new council homes, and 1000 homes to part-buy or rent at around 60% of market rates. Decent, truly affordable housing is one of the main ways we can get a grip on growing costs and tackle poverty and inequality locally.

We have no choice but to face the financial situation as it is, whilst fighting for a better deal from the Tory government. The Labour leadership made it clear last year that Labour councils cannot set illegal budgets by spending more than they bring in, and this was enshrined in Party rules by the NEC recently. We won’t be pushed down the wholesale privatisation route the Tories want, but we won’t just wash our hands of responsibility for the situation we find ourselves in – as the Greens did at the last budget council. The cuts we will have to make will be difficult and painful. None of us stood for election to make things worse, but we owe it to those who elected us to fight for the best possible outcomes under the worst of Governments.

We will make every effort to focus the money we have on getting the basics right, delivering the best services possible, and doing the right thing by those who most need help. We are paying all our staff the local Living Wage, and defending as many jobs as we can by bringing in new revenue. Where we can share services, use not-for-profit providers, get help from our communities and work in partnership with the voluntary sector to keep services running, we will.

It is a huge and very difficult task, but we are up for the challenge if you are behind us, supporting us in the face of these Tory-imposed cuts. Labour councils can make a difference, can deliver our values in office, and Labour will win nationally by showing we can run things locally. Let’s fight for our city and our services together. 
You can find information about the council’s current budget here.

Why winning matters

 

Labour foughrosettet long and hard to win in Brighton and Hove in 2015, to win three seats in the House of Commons from the Tories and Greens, and to win enough seats from the Tories and Greens on the city council to take power. Peter Kyle won Hove and Portslade, Nancy Platts came agonisingly close in Brighton Kemptown, and Purna Sen put up a strong showing against the sole Green MP Caroline Lucas. Had we won all three and other South East marginals, the Tories might have been denied a majority.

Locally we won a dozen seats from the Greens, and one from the Tories, whilst losing two, to become the largest party on the city council but five short of a majority. We have set about using the power we do have, with no majority in a committee system council, to make a difference.

To get the basics like street cleaning and refuse and recycling right, despite 40% cuts to our budget by central government. To tackle homelessness and improve mental health provision in the city. To make the private rented sector fairer for tenants. To build 500 new council homes for people on our waiting list, and a thousand truly affordable homes for people priced out of the housing market, people our businesses need.

To deliver a fairer city where everyone benefits from our economic success via the recommendations of our Fairness Commission. To restore our infrastructure and heritage, and create new infrastructure and business space to create jobs and revenue that will fund our basic services. To win devolved powers that will help create even more jobs and homes in our city for people who desperately need them. It involves making hard and unpopular choices. Always has and always will, but right now it is harder than ever.

We could not have begun any of this, and more, had we not scraped a narrow three-seat advantage over the Conservatives, who would by now be setting about the wholesale privatisation and closure of services across Brighton and Hove had they finished first. We need a majority in 2019 to finish the job. We need a Labour Government in Westminster to enable us to succeed. Winning elections means delivering change. Never perfect, but better than opposition.

Today’s poll of Labour members shows that of those members who fought alongside us in 2015, almost 70% back Owen Smith as a Leader who can win power for Labour and deliver change for those who need it most. Of those who have joined Labour since, the same percentage back Jeremy Corbyn, despite only a third of all members believing he can win a General Election.

Think about that. People taking a conscious decision to elect a leader they believe will lead his party to defeat. Deliberately choosing opposition over power. It is, in my view, a criminal abrogation of responsibility to those who need Labour in office, delivering change.

I’ve been a Labour member for nearly twenty five years, a councillor for thirteen, a campaigner in five General Elections and five sets of local elections in Brighton and Hove. Winning elections has always been my goal, not as an end in itself but as a means to an end, to being in a position to lead change, not protest for it.

I want to be part of a party that strives for the power to deliver a better city and a better country, not a movement which shouts at perpetual Conservative government in the town hall and in the Commons.

I will choose difficult power over glorious opposition every time.

 

Europe – it’s personal

21505_EU-flag-missing-starThis is a purely personal reflection on the result of the EU Referendum last week.

You probably can’t grow up on the South Coast of England without having a slightly different relationship to the European continent than perhaps someone who grew up in Wales or Yorkshire. You can’t see mainland Europe from the Sussex coast but you know it’s there, over the horizon, just a short ferry ride from Newhaven.

I was only five years old when Britain joined what was then the EEC. Unlike the frequent power cuts of the first miners strike, and Education Secretary Margaret Thatcher’s axeing of school milk (and my job as a milk monitor), it didn’t register with me. Why would it.

School trips and family holidays to France and other European destinations were part of my childhood, as were the occasional spells with language students renting the spare room in my parents house. At around the time my sister moved to France to work, my family bought a barn nearby for a while; my aunt and uncle stayed and whilst my sister eventually came home, my niece and nephew are half-French.

A late-found enthusiasm for the language led me to study French for a year at University, then moving on to a politics course that took in what was then called European Community studies. Even after a four year break I was still proficient enough to spend the best part of a year working near Paris with a holiday company, which led to what was meant to be a part-time call centre job when I came back. That turned into a five-year stint managing the phone inquiry service for the French Government Tourist Office.

I’m not a big traveller, but in the years since leaving that job I’ve been lucky enough to have had a few summer holidays in Greece and Portugal, and a couple of trips to Prague and Budapest, seeing the places where my partner’s parents grew up. Like millions of people, my partner’s family have made a life in Spain where their young daughter is just as much Spanish as English.

They are worried about the implications of last week’s decision to leave the European Union. So is my friend, a special needs teacher originally from Germany, and one of my councillor colleagues who is also German.

Of course, in the long run their fears may be unfounded, just as the immediate and longer term economic effects may not turn out to be as catastrophic as some reports suggest. The legal, constitutional and financial negotiations will be lengthy and complex. For anyone perceived as not “British” though, the open and public actions of an ugly minority in recent days across the country is frightening. It should be for all of us.

At the heart of it I can’t seem to shake off a feeling based on something I had never considered during the long run-up to the vote, during the many debates about the EU as an institution and the effects of free movement on our society.It isn’t something that is in any way meant to be critical of those who argued to leave, including colleagues I respect.

It’s a feeling, not a practical complaint, as I know those occasional trips to a Greek island will of course still be possible, and things in terms of friends and family things won’t change. Like it or not we have no choice but to be part of Europe geographically and culturally, albeit one separated by a thin channel of water.

I will no doubt be sad to see Scotland go independent as seems likely, but having only visited there once I don’t feel the same connection. If Ireland and Wales go the same way we will all have to revisit what it means to be British or English in light of the 400 year old United Kingdom ceasing to exist.

I hadn’t realised how much my European citizenship means to me, and what it means to lose it. I will have to come to terms with the fact that I have, and that things will never be quite the same as they have been for the majority of my life.

There are undoubtedly more important immediate and practical things to worry about. We need to accept the situation as it is. I’ve a job to do in ensuring the city I lead succeeds and prospers through whatever happens next, but this is something I wanted to write down in the hope that I can deal with it and move on.

Welcome to Brighton and Hove, our international city

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At an event to mark the end of Refugee Week I spoke about how proud I was of my home city, the city I’ve been given the honour of leading, having sent a message that it is an open, welcoming and international city this week. I spoke of how we welcome as we always have done those fleeing conflict, and pledged that we would take more children who have lost homes and family through war and give them a future. I said that we would do this to honour the memory of Jo Cox, who supported the Dubs Amendment, and that we would play our small part in continuing her work.

During the event a man came up behind me and shouted “don’t you know, the borders are now closed!” Clearly a reference to this week’s EU Referendum where for many, the motivation behind their vote was immigration. Now let me be clear that many who voted Leave are not racist, had a valid case for ending our membership of the EU, and who distanced themselves from some of the appalling rhetoric used by some during the campaign.

The worst was the “Breaking Point” poster unveiled by Nigel Farage in the closing days of the campaign, an image reminiscent of ones used by the Nazis of snaking queues of migrants, in this case refugees fleeing war in Syria on their way to Slovakia.

It is right that there is a discussion about migration, but it is very hard to keep that debate to the facts. Facts such as the net benefit to the UK economy and health service of migration, facts about UK residents migrating to other EU countries. The UK is not at “breaking point” in that our capacity to build and house a growing population exists, and that as the fifth largest economy – at least until last Friday – we can afford to play our part in receiving at least a fraction of the numbers of refugees as other states.

Elements of the media and groups like UKIP have for years fuelled a distrust and resentment of migrants, and the Referendum debate and result has exposed a deep seam of xenophobia and in some cases racism against anyone “foreign” or different, regardless of where they are from, how long they have been here or where they were born. Many people have, in the hours since the result, spoken of their fears, of the open abuse, of the uncertainty about their place in this country that they are now experiencing.

This cannot be our future; one built on the prejudices of the past. Not here.

Brighton and Hove is an international city, facing the European continent across the narrow Channel that separates us physically if not culturally or economically from mainland Europe. Our universities take in students from all over the globe, as do our language colleges. Eleven million tourists come each year, many to visit our historic Pavilion, built two centuries ago by a German prince to resemble an Indian palace on the outside, and a Chinese one inside. It isn’t, as some assumed, a mosque.

The vast modern European headquarters of American Express, completed in the past few years, employs more than any other business in our city, with a workforce blending the local and the global. Nearby work is underway on a £450 million hospital refurbishment that will create a regional centre for the 21st century, one that could not function without doctors, nurses and support staff from all over the world.

Our current and future conference centres depend on international convention business. Our creative digital industry sells to Europe and beyond. Our annual Festival and year-round cultural programme showcases arts from every corner of our planet.

Our city depends and thrives on tourism, healthcare, culture and businesses that in turn depend on being open to Europe and the world. We are indebted to those who come here, spend here, live here, pay taxes here, employ here, study here. I send out a clear message today that you are just as welcome tomorrow as you were yesterday.